Leaves of Limburg Leaves of Limburg

by 
Jeroen Bocken

Limited edition of 20
Incl. signed and numbered certificate
€320
Year 2019
Size 50 × 40 [cm]
Paper Type Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta
Print Type Inkjet archival print
Year 2019
Size 50 × 40 [cm]
Pages Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta
ISBN Inkjet archival print

About the artist

In his series Een aanneembare wereld (from which Leaves of Limburg is taken) Bocken explores the fruit region of Haspengouw in Belgium. Here, he found farmers using “hail cannons” to protect their orchards during storms. Yet despite the locals’ absolute faith in these machines, there is little proof of their effectiveness. In this idyllic depiction, Bocken reflects on the relationship between nature and humanity. How much control do we have over our environment? And is it all a matter of perception?

Image © John Kramer

“The purpose of the hail cannon is to prevent the weather from destroying a complete year of work for the farmers...It’s exploding gas that creates a kind of vortex in the air, which is supposed to disorder the positive and negative ions in the sky. This should prevent hail.”

“I love that they use this simple machine to fight against something as big as the weather, to fight against gods almost.”

Images © Ewout Huibers

Jeroen Bocken

Antwerp, Belgium

Fascinated by the differences in our individual realities, Jeroen Bocken (b.1994, BE) plays with perception and the assumed authority of photography. Hyper-idealised aesthetics are contrasted with nature to create ambiguous documentary images that demonstrate photography’s power to influence our perception of reality. For Unseen Amsterdam 2019, Bocken took residency in Room on the Roof at de Bijenkorf, creating a multi-disciplinary installation titled Een aanneembare wereld (An Acceptable World). In this work Bocken explores the fruit region of Haspengouw in Belgium, considering the relationship between humans and the natural world.

About the artist

In his series Een aanneembare wereld (from which Leaves of Limburg is taken) Bocken explores the fruit region of Haspengouw in Belgium. Here, he found farmers using “hail cannons” to protect their orchards during storms. Yet despite the locals’ absolute faith in these machines, there is little proof of their effectiveness. In this idyllic depiction, Bocken reflects on the relationship between nature and humanity. How much control do we have over our environment? And is it all a matter of perception?

Image © John Kramer

“The purpose of the hail cannon is to prevent the weather from destroying a complete year of work for the farmers...It’s exploding gas that creates a kind of vortex in the air, which is supposed to disorder the positive and negative ions in the sky. This should prevent hail.”

“I love that they use this simple machine to fight against something as big as the weather, to fight against gods almost.”

Images © Ewout Huibers

Jeroen Bocken

Antwerp, Belgium

Fascinated by the differences in our individual realities, Jeroen Bocken (b.1994, BE) plays with perception and the assumed authority of photography. Hyper-idealised aesthetics are contrasted with nature to create ambiguous documentary images that demonstrate photography’s power to influence our perception of reality. For Unseen Amsterdam 2019, Bocken took residency in Room on the Roof at de Bijenkorf, creating a multi-disciplinary installation titled Een aanneembare wereld (An Acceptable World). In this work Bocken explores the fruit region of Haspengouw in Belgium, considering the relationship between humans and the natural world.

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